Top 10 Reasons I Did Not Finish (DNF)…

The book you perverts! What did you think I was going to say? 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Duh! It was boring me to death…

  • It was depressing…

  • The main character got on my nerves…

  • There was no story line…
  • The author starts to put race into it…

  • There’s too much physical and/or emotional abuse…

  • It brings up painful memories from my past…

  • It was just stupid…

  • It was so cliche…

Everyone has their reasons why they DNF a book but these are mine. For the most part I hate not finishing a book, I feel like I’m missing out on something. Then there are times I think about not finishing a book but keep going and find out the author blew me away at the end. It’s rare for me to not finish a book so if I do, it’s for good reason.

TTYL…

7 thoughts on “Top 10 Reasons I Did Not Finish (DNF)…

  1. thesarahdoughty says:

    I’d have to agree with you there. Triggers and topics that infuse race when there’s no apparent reason for it, especially when they’re trying to make some kind of point, rather than letting the characters go their own way. I find believability to be an issue at times too. If I can’t understand or fathom why characters are behaving a certain way, I’ll be much less likely to continue. After all, if you don’t care about the characters, let alone what happens to them, you’re better off finding something that will.

    • prettygirlreading says:

      My thoughts actually! I couldn’t have said it better myself. Sometimes it’s appropriate to add race but I hate when I see it added for no reasons. Not just for blacks but for any race, it bothers me.

      • thesarahdoughty says:

        I agree. I know race was a factor in my novel, Home, but it was always meant to. Both in race and species. It wasn’t an underhanded meaning, but another perspective that not many might notice or understand. The only other book(s) I’ve read that has addressed the issue without seeming like it’s trying to shove an idea down reader’s throats is Flow and Grip by Kennedy Ryan.

  2. rmanees says:

    I am a Black author and most (but not all) of the characters in my novels are Black. I don’t understand the problem with putting “race” into a book. In fact, I don’t understand what is meant by that. All of the characters of any book are of one race or another–that’s just part of the human condition. Unfortunately, I feel what may be meant by this is that some or all of the characters are of a race other than white. I am an avid reader and in my lifetime the vast majority of the books I have read involve characters who are not Black. Why would a white person have a problem reading a book in which most of the characters are not white? It is possible to write a book with characters who are Black and not have the book revolve around racial issues. I have done it over a dozen times.

    • prettygirlreading says:

      You got the wrong idea from my post. I mean when race is used in a negative connotation, no matter the race. It has nothing to do with black or white, there are more that two races in the world. I hate books that talk shit about someone’s religion as well. I find it difficult to read book about child abuse or child molestation. I don’t like books that use terms like wet-backs, rag heads, niggers, pigs, crackers, etc.I don’t like it. It’s why I don’t finish a book. What you do or do not like it a book makes no difference to me, I don’t give a shit, keep reading what you want. I read to block the world out, I state so in my bio. Why the fuck would I want to read a book where it takes me into the real world, I get enough of that shit when I’m not reading. I mean shit, my husband is fucking white. Don’t read to much into one sentence, love. Find something better to do.

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